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100 years of Garfield High School Memories

1970s
2000s
2010s
2020s
Paulette Rivers
Class of 1976

My most memorable Garfield moment was the BULLDOG PRIDE I felt when I first saw the Garfield Marching 100's at halftime of a football game!!! I was a new student having just arrived to Seattle from St. Louis, MO and I instantly became a Bulldog4Life!! The Marching
100's under the direction of Clarence Acox were THE BEST in the State, bar none!! I will never forget my Garfield High years!! B4L!!

Afua Kouyate
Class of 1976

My name was Alicia Lee. I graduated in the GHS class of 1976. I began at Garfield as a 9th grader. My history teacher was Joe Nartey. He was from Ghana, West Africa. He worked with me and a handful of students towards learning African music and dance and we received history credit and PE credit. This really stood out to me as that learning about my culture was my top interest. We became popular and performed in community often. I was already studying and performing with local artists in the community, therefore my high school level of study became a real dream for me. That was over 50 years ago. Since then, I’ve traveled to Africa multiple times, lives in Africa and now host groups of people to Africa to study and experience African culture during the school  holidays. Palsied the founder and Executive Director of a nonprofit organization that is committed to youth and families having cultural awareness activities within schools and community. I’m still performing and teaching African Music, Song & Dance. These beautiful memories of my times in study at GHS stands tall within me still today!

Winona Hollins
Class of 1971

My best memories are about those dedicated staff and faculty who encouraged us to press on during the turbulent years of civil rights and free will protests. Mrs Dorothy Pounds saw an opportunity to reach out via the Career Center. She posted and announced a program with MA Bell or Pacific NW Bell telephone company to hire several of us in work study after school. We were sent down to take a test and then assigned areas. I went down with my bff the late Charlene Victoria Ervin Elleby to work in CTI. Central ticket investigation. Mary Cheatum and others were the older workers we used as role models. They were well dressed and serious about working . We used that evening position all the way thru college to support our young families as married women with new babies in our early years of study at the UW.

Winona Hollins
Class of 1971

My best memories are about those dedicated staff and faculty who encouraged us to press on during the turbulent years of civil rights and free will protests. Mrs Dorothy Pounds saw an opportunity to reach out via the Career Center. She posted and announced a program with MA Bell or Pacific NW Bell telephone company to hire several of us in work study after school. We were sent down to take a test and then assigned areas. I went down with my bff the late Charlene Victoria Ervin Elleby to work in CTI. Central ticket investigation. Mary Cheatum and others were the older workers we used as role models. They were well dressed and serious about working . We used that evening position all the way thru college to support our young families as married women with new babies in our early years of study at the UW.

Debra Lyles-Mobley
Class of 1972

I grew up in the CD, went to Madrona Elementary, then spent the next 8 yrs in Catholic schools, including St. James Cathedral and Holy Names, an all girls' school, with a VERY SMALL Black student body. While at Holy Names, the turbulence and Black empowerment of the 60's-70's motivated me and others to start a Black Student Union, but I realized in my sophomore year, that even though I was getting a great education and spiritual guidance, something was still missing. It wasn't until I transferred to Garfield High in the Fall of 1970, my junior year, that I realized what that something was. I walked into a school with such a diverse student body in race, class and beliefs. There were BLACK TEACHERS, both men and women. Here was a school that celebrated being Black, yet embraced students of all colors and nationalities. There were teachers, both Black and White, who were challenging the minds and values of students who wanted to learn and make a difference! I had teachers who made me feel like my thoughts and ideas mattered, even when I was questioning myself. I had so many choices beyond the regular classes to enhance my education. I was overwhelmed, but what a POWERFUL TIME to be a student at GHS! With the classes, assemblies, festivals, games and the dances, there was a great balance between our education and having fun. My uncle, Clarence Sonnii Bibbs, my mother, Margaret Lyles, my brother, Kenny Lyles, my niece, Tess Lyles, we all walked through those doors. I made lifelong friends who are still in my life. Those 2 years had such an impact on me. The confidence, the pride and the exposure that I gained to so many things, influenced me even to this day! The roots run deep. I'M SO GLAD I WENT TO GARFIELD HIGH! : )

Kathleen Ahmad
Class of 1972

I was in the class of 72. First for the Garfield 100's. I played a clarinet, and I will never forget playing for sports events, marching in a parade down 23rd. I was so proud to wear that uniform. 50 years later I can still hear Clarence Acox telling us to
keep our leg parrallel to the groud. Best days of my young life.